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“Nothing in nature, no animal, no brain, works by executing an algorithm. (That’s what makes an algorithm so great – they’re a new idea.) An analogue computer is nearer to natural processes.”
@Hainbach101’s wonderful livestream on analogue computing: https://youtu.be/bgyzeyatS-0?t=1014

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“…everything is so damn Podcast-y and YouToob-ish now a days. It would be nice to have a place where one can go to read a little, maybe browse a few photos about music gear and…”
40 interviews since the lockdown started. And they just keep on coming: martinyammoller.com

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Here’s a nice website with home-studio setups and interviews and quite a few faces from the Copenhagen scene: martinyammoller.com

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Mononoke #jamuary @bram_bos apps.apple.com/app/id1492577124

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Mononoke #jamuary @bram_bos ruismaker.com/mononoke/

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At a concert with beautiful performances by @madsemilnielsen and @andrewpekler a few weeks ago, the gentleman next to me and took out his sketchpad, pens, and inks. I guess that’s another way of approaching music and visuals… @arbitrary_cph

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Helge Slaatto performs fuglens flugt in Holte tomorrow (Nono, Borup-Jørgensen and von Schweinitz are also along) seismograf.org/event/2017/10/29/nyt-og-gammelt-i-holte-diverse

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Building, Exploring, Composing. Thoughts on the relation between building instruments and making music with them:
frankensteins-lab.net/labs/building-exploring-composing

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Jan Stricker and Rasmus Cleve Christensen’s fine Lyt Dybt podcast has a great episode covering the history of STEIM.

The podcast is generally in Danish, but a good deal of this episode is in English, thanks to guest Andi Otto.

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Riveting performances of Feldman and Ergün by the @jackquartet at Klang Festival last night:

Morton Feldman’s Structures played with beautiful sounds and incredible precision. Restful in what it is, with hints of what was to come in the late string quartets, yet sounding surprisingly up-to-date for a piece that was composed in 1951.

Cenk Ergün’s Sonare is the kind of piece where one can’t quite figure out how it’s done, even though the material seems clear enough on the surface. How is it that an unamplified string quartet can produce so much sound?

Here’s an interview on how it came about.